Because of proximity, this dive is often paired with the Daryl Laut, but there’s enough at each site to keep divers busy on multiple visits.

Divers begin to explore Kirby’s Rock in Anilao by leaving the dive boat near a rocky wall with a little wave action. After dropping down to about 20 feet (6 m) or so, you’ll start to see soft and hard corals and schools of reef fish. Within five minutes, we saw a large purple frogfish. He was just hanging out on the rock wall at around 30 feet (10 m).

Kirby’s Rock

After navigating along the wall for a bit, you’ll swim out to Kirby’s Rock. When we first saw this large rock, we thought yellow nudibranchs were covering it. We were astounded by the quantity of them. But upon closer inspection, instead of nudis, we discovered they were actually small sea cucumbers. This was still very cool since there were so many of them. As we made our way around the rock, we saw multiple moray eels hiding in their holes and one free-swimming. Hard and soft corals were abundant on the rock, including gorgonians and crinoids in a range of colors. Keep an eye out for scorpionfish and lionfish as well, and look closely for nudis here and there.

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