Because of proximity, this dive is often paired with the Daryl Laut, but there’s enough at each site to keep divers busy on multiple visits.

Divers begin to explore Kirby’s Rock in Anilao by leaving the dive boat near a rocky wall with a little wave action. After dropping down to about 20 feet (6 m) or so, you’ll start to see soft and hard corals and schools of reef fish. Within five minutes, we saw a large purple frogfish. He was just hanging out on the rock wall at around 30 feet (10 m).

Kirby’s Rock

After navigating along the wall for a bit, you’ll swim out to Kirby’s Rock. When we first saw this large rock, we thought yellow nudibranchs were covering it. We were astounded by the quantity of them. But upon closer inspection, instead of nudis, we discovered they were actually small sea cucumbers. This was still very cool since there were so many of them. As we made our way around the rock, we saw multiple moray eels hiding in their holes and one free-swimming. Hard and soft corals were abundant on the rock, including gorgonians and crinoids in a range of colors. Keep an eye out for scorpionfish and lionfish as well, and look closely for nudis here and there.

Have something to add to this post? Share it in the comments.
New stuff

More Than 2,000 Sharks Die in San Francisco Bay

Scientists are trying to explain a massive die-off of leopard sharks, Pacific angel sharks, and brown smooth-hound sharks in the San Francisco Bay.
by Thomas Gronfeldt
PADI specialties

Most Challenging PADI Specialties

Leaving your comfort zone (in gradual and controlled circumstances) can make you a better diver. What are the most challenging PADI specialties to help you grow?
by Andy Phillips
Ear Barotrauma

Training Fundamentals: Ear Barotrauma

The most common scuba diving-related injury is ear barotrauma. Why does it happen, and how can you avoid it?
by Marcus Knight
Spanish Dancer

Marine Species: Spanish Dancer

On a night dive in the tropical Pacific, you see what appears to be an animated vermillion dinner napkin convulsing wildly. Congratulations, you’ve spotted a Spanish dancer.
by Guest Author Christina Koukkos