Author

Marcus Knight

Marcus Knight

Marcus Knight (aka “The Scuba Monkey”) first dived during the ‘90s and was bitten by the scuba bug. During the years that followed, Marcus became absorbed in diving and, today, is a Master Instructor for both PADI and SSI.

With over a decade as a professional diver, Marcus has lived and taught
scuba around the world, including Australia, Asia, the Mediterranean Sea and the wreck heaven of Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands. Check out his website here.

Stories by Marcus
Rescue Diver
Training

Training Fundamentals: Becoming a Rescue Diver

The rescue diver course is a key step in a diver’s development. How will you know when you’re ready and how can you prepare?

by
surface signaling devices
Training

Training Fundamentals: Best Surface Signaling Devices for Divers

Surface signaling devices are an essential piece of diving equipment. In what circumstances might you use one and what options are available?

by
scuba instructor
Training

Training Fundamentals: Becoming a Better Scuba Instructor

Becoming a better scuba instructor is an ongoing process. What makes a good instructor and how do you improve?

by
peak performance buoyancy
Training

Training Fundamentals: Peak Performance Buoyancy

Good buoyancy is the cornerstone of good diving. Learn how practicing peak performance buoyancy will make all your dives better.

by
New stuff
help the ocean

Five Places Where You Can Help the Ocean While Traveling

If you’re an ocean lover and environmentalist, here are five places where you can help the ocean while traveling.
by Torben Lonne
hammerhead shark

Marine Species: Hammerhead Shark

It’s got one of the (arguably) weirdest faces in the ocean, and the hammerhead shark is on nearly every diver’s bucket list.
by Hélène Reynaud
Rescue Diver

Training Fundamentals: Becoming a Rescue Diver

The rescue diver course is a key step in a diver’s development. How will you know when you’re ready and how can you prepare?
by Marcus Knight
seahorses

Don't Touch the Seahorses

Touching seahorses to manipulate them for pictures (and using a strong flash) is a big no-no, as it causes the animals much stress.
by Juanita Pienaar