We no longer live in the era of top-down design. Finally the rebreather market has reached a critical mass where consumers have true power to demand features they wish to see integrated into new rebreather designs.

by Jill Heinerth

As more companies enter the marketplace, competition allows for consumers to open a dialogue with manufacturers. The ultimate survivors will be the companies that understand social media and new shopping paradigms that are completely interwoven through the Internet. Manufacturers that ignore service concerns or technical issues that are bantered around on Facebook, Twitter and forums will do so at their peril.

A while ago, I had the opportunity to dive an early beta version of the new Juergenson Hammerhead Rebreather. There were several technical issues that I felt quite strongly about. After reviewing my lengthy comments and taking them under consideration, Jakub Rehacek from Golem Gear sent a note to let me know they were addressing every single concern I had noted. Kudos to Jakub for being sensitive to the market and listening to his customer base. He’ll be around a long, long time if he keeps that up!

You have a voice too. Speak to the manufacturers. You might be surprised how much they want and need your feedback.

More from Jill at:www.IntoThePlanet.com

Image 1: Acclaimed rebreather exploration divers Brian Kakuk and Paul Heinerth during a NOAA project off Bermuda. Brian dives a Megalodon from Innerspace Systems and Paul a DiveRite Optima.

Image 2. Jill Heinerth hangs out on deco after the deepest dives ever conducted off Bermuda. Jill uses a Sentinel rebreather from Kevin Gurr at VR Technologies for her deep exploration dives.

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