The world’s top female underwater explorer Jill Heinerth is launching a campaign to reconnect people to their most precious commodity – water.

The renowned filmmaker is producing a documentary, We Are Water, to raise public awareness about the earth’s finite water resources.

Night descends on Little River Spring in Branford, Florida. Photo: Jill Heinerth

Night descends on Little River Spring in Branford, Florida. Photo: Jill Heinerth

The Canadian explorer, 47, is issuing a call to arms to change people’s thinking. In the documentary, she takes viewers on a breathtaking journey through the Earth’s arteries from deep underwater caves to the Great Lakes in bid to show the public where their water comes from – and ultimately, how to protect it.

The documentary follows Heinerth’s extraordinary journeys in water, showcasing some of her most spectacular underwater footage, as well as exploring humanity’s traditional spiritual connection to water. During her career – supported by Suunto – Heinerth has dived inside giant icebergs in Antarctica, dived under the Ural mountains of Siberia and has explored deeper into the planet than any woman in history.

A diver slips between massive columns in Crystal Cave Bermuda. Photo: Jill Heinerth

“I swim under your homes, your businesses, golf courses, bowling alleys – all kinds of places where people don’t imagine their drinking water is flowing. In cave diving I swim inside the veins of mother earth. It’s easy to forget where water comes from. We take it for granted that it comes out of a tap but we can no longer afford to do so.” says Heinerth.

“One of the most important things that I want to encourage is to simply take a child to a river, a lake, a spring, or the ocean. Reconnect yourself and your family with water. Enjoy it, dive it, swim it, paddle it, experience it because when you love it, you’ll want to protect it.”

Heinerth calls upon anyone who loves water to pledge their support via the fundraising platform www.IndieGoGo.com/WeAreWater and check out the website www.WeAreWaterProject.com which goes live today.

Paul Heinerth escapes from Ice Island Cave #4 in Antarctica. Photo: Jill Heinerth

Suunto, the leading dive computer brand, is a project partner.

“We are very proud to be a part of this project,” says Mikko Moilanen, President & CEO of Suunto. “It’s a cause close to our hearts – we are divers ourselves and also want to protect what we love. Our dive computers have helped Jill stay safe during some of her incredible explorations and we’re keen to support her on this important journey.”

About the documentary:
The film entices viewers with the natural beauty of the watery world, challenging them to make simple changes to protect and preserve the earth’s clean water. It is scheduled for release on November 1st.

About Jill Heinerth:
Jill Heinerth has dived deeper into caves than any woman in history. With a collection of magnificent images – from inside Antarctic icebergs to the subterranean Siberia – Jill shares a glimpse of a breathtaking world few will experience. An award-winning filmmaker, her accolades include being named a “Living Legend” by Sport Diver Magazine, induction into the exclusive New York Explorer’s Club and the inaugural class of the Women Diver’s Hall of Fame. Born in Canada, Jill lives with her husband Robert, in North Florida, where she starts most days with a refreshing swim in the clear waters of her local spring.

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