Jul 20

Tropical Diving: Tips on Doing it Right!

By Graeme Contributor

Graeme is an experienced and well trained diver, with PADI Divemaster and Master Scuba Diver status in addition to CAUS Scientific Diver Lv.2 and being a Canadian standards (CSA Z275.4-02 and CSA Z275.5-05) trained commercial scuba and surface supply diver. Currently employed as a commercial diver in the interior of British Columbia, he is always looking to improve his skills, gain new qualifications, and do as much diving as possible!

Tropical water. It's what most people immediately associate with scuba diving. The warm water, fantastic marine life, and picturesque beaches all play a big part in this vision. Unfortunately, a lot of people get excited and forget or ignore their training and the advice of their dive guides or the dive shops they frequent. Diving in warm water is fantastic, but the following tips will help make sure you don't have a bad day under the sea!

Buoyancy, buoyancy, buoyancy. While not all coral is fragile, and not everything is poisonous or bite-y, it's best not to take the risk. With wrecks, it's even more important, especially if you're planning to do a penetration. Buoyancy is something a lot of people harp on, and not without reason. No one likes being partnered with the guy who crawls along the bottom or who goes through their air in 30 minutes on a shallow dive because they can't control their buoyancy. More over, it becomes a conservation issue. If you pull apart a reef while you explore it, you're hardly leaving the place in decent condition for the next divers! Not touching everything is a cardinal rule of recreational diving, and even more so in tropical waters, mostly because of the high concentration of poisonous and/or irritable marine life found there. Buoyancy control is key to preventing the need for you to grab onto things or accidentally brush against things that will ruin the dive for you!

Dealing with stings, scratches and irritations of the skin are almost inevitable in tropical water. Personally, I've been zapped by a stray jellyfish tentacle (invisible in the water!) and brushed against hydroids (such are the risks of wearing a shortie). It happens. Sometimes it's bad enough you need to abort the dive and do some first aid. Before you hit the water, make sure your dive group has a first aid kit on hand, and that it's stocked with the area appropriate sting treatment. If you can, brush up on sites before hand and read up on the first aid yourself. Severe hits though, like from Lionfish or Stonefish, need immediate emergency care, and make sure you know the emergency plan for casualty evacuation.

Equipment maintenance is the last thing I'll cover here today, since this could very easily turn into a pamphlet sized article! Equipment maintenance in the tropics is even more important than it is in cold water. Why? Mold and fungus are why. Ensuring equipment is properly cleaned and hung to dry is vital in tropical climes. BCD's need to be rinsed internally with fresh water at least every three or four days if you're diving regularly, and always should be stored with a bit of air in them. Masks, snorkels and regulators need to be cleaned thoroughly everyday and checked regularly for any sign of mold or fungus. If you find some, clean the unit carefully with a solution recommended by the manufacturer or the diveshop. This will prolong the service life of your gear, and also help keep you from developing any nasty illnesses.

These are just a few tips and ideas of many for making your tropical diving experience a good, and safe one. As long as you're an attentive diver, you should do fine, and don't hesitate to ask questions if you're unsure of something. Remember: good divers ask questions and confirm things, bad divers jump in and hope that it all works out!

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