If you’re a diver, you probably have a few answers to that question. And if you’re not (yet) a diver, you might guess a couple.

As a Life Coach and Dive Instructor, I’ve seen first hand just how powerful scuba diving can be when it comes to having personal breakthroughs.
The most obvious reason (but by no means the only reason) is that it’s an opportunity to step outside your “comfort zone”. Literally and figuratively.

scuba_growth

Many people have some anxiety or fear around diving at the beginning. Which is perfectly reasonable, given that we’re not able to naturally breathe under water. And while it’s been said that scuba diving is safer than driving a bicycle down a city street, in some people’s eyes it still appears to be an “extreme sport”.

(Side note to non-divers—if you dive with common sense, like staying within your level of training and experience, the only thing extreme about being an Open Water diver is the amount of peace and joy you will experience.)

But if you look closely—you’ll see that your “comfort zone” is pretty much defined by your point of view and your beliefs.

For example, if you’ve never been diving you might be thinking about a cold, dark place that hides all the scary creatures that are going to harm you. Or you might be thinking about the equipment that’s going to malfunction. Or that you’re just not capable of doing it—that maybe it’s just too technical, or challenging for you to handle.

These thoughts are what make you afraid and stressed. And these thoughts are what will likely (and unfortunately) stop you from experiencing the incredible freedom, aliveness, peacefulness and joy that come from diving in clear, warm tropical waters. And the thing is, this isn’t just true about diving—this is true about life. The intimate relationship, the fulfilling career or business, the rewarding friendships, the physical health and well-being—all the things that we want in our life but don’t have because of our inner barriers of limiting beliefs and disempowering points of view.

The way to break through these barriers—in ANY area of life—is to first discover what those limiting beliefs are. To identify and acknowledge the disempowering stories that we tell ourselves about the world, about other people, and about ourselves. And then—once we get clear on our CURRENT point of view and the lens through which we look, we’re able to SHIFT how we see things. We’re then able to see things newly—and create expanded and empowering ways of looking at the world and ourselves.

And while this “breakthrough process” works with ANY area of life, not just scuba diving—there’s no context I know of that provides such a clear and powerful opportunity to learn and experience it, as scuba diving.

Which is why I created Breakthrough Adventures—a 7-day “personal breakthrough and scuba diving” adventure in the Caribbean. It combines “discovery and re-creation” workshops, the PADI Open Water Diver course, and one-on-one coaching so you learn how to break through ANY fear, lack or limitation in your life.

AND, become a scuba diver! (C’mon, you know you want to…)

Have something to add to this post? Share it in the comments.
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