Long thought of as a man’s sport, the world of scuba diving continues to attract fearless, adventuresome women

In March, we celebrated International Women’s Day, and what better way to honor it than by highlighting how now, more than ever, the scuba industry is overflowing with women photographers, marine conservationists and dive pros, just to name a few ways they’re contributing to the sport. Scuba diving has not always been so welcoming of women; in fact, when I started my career as a Divemaster just two years ago, I wasn’t taken seriously and my abilities were doubted just because I am a woman. So here, we’ll set the record straight about women and scuba diving, and encourage all of you who have yet to try diving. There are countless ways that women and scuba diving go together; here are just a few.

Pushing Boundaries

A sport that is often thought to be dangerous or as appealing just to men has seen an influx of women within the last decade. Women of all ages are trying out scuba diving and realizing that neither of those assumptions are true. Confronting our fears and stepping (or should I say swimming) out of our comfort zone is liberating and almost addictive. And further, women have created all-women dive clubs to encourage others to join in the sport, forming friendships and communities along the way.

Full-Body Workout

Can you get a workout from scuba diving? If you want to get scientific about this; water is heavy than air. What does that mean for your muscles? Resistance without the sweating and heavy lifting. As diving is a low-impact sport, we don’t feel this strain on our bodies like we do at the gym, and can float through the water with ease. A full-body workout with little effort, and the bonus of seeing some of the most beautiful creatures on this planet? Sign us up.

World Travel

As a qualified scuba diver, your world is now 71 percent more open to exploration than it was before – the percent of the planet covered in water. Diving is also a great activity for solo female travelers — you’ll always be paired with a dive buddy on a boat, offering the opportunity to make a new friend. So now that you’ve got your scuba gear, get yourself a plane ticket and see more of the world than ever before.

Fearless Go-getters

We love inspirational scuba stories, and many women have begun to to write about, photograph, and share their adventures with all of us. Some women, such as the CEO of this very website, have been able to make careers of their passion by letting the world into their scuba adventures. As mentioned above, conservationist Andrea Marshall has dedicated her life to protecting manta rays, as well as other marine life, and invites you to join her in identifying these magnificent creatures underwater.

Women Divers Hall of Fame

The Women Divers Hall of Fame recognizes women divers who have made outstanding contributions to the exploration, understanding, safety and enjoyment of our underwater world. From conservationists to photographers to those who catalog and explore shipwrecks, all of these fearless females are advocates for our ocean planet.

With so many role models and opportunities available to female scuba divers, it’s easy to see why our sport is attracting more and more women. If you’re not yet part of our tribe, isn’t it time to give it a try? If you’re already a diver, grab your fins: we’ll see you down there.

Guest author Sarah Richard is a travel writer currently living in Hong Kong. She is a divemaster who has been diving for eight years and has most recently worked on a liveaboard in Micronesia. Follow her adventures on her travel blog or on Facebook.

 

 

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